Controlling Reveal.js Presentations with an Apple Remote

Lately I’ve been building all of my presentations with Reveal.js. It’s great to be able to talk about all the latest HTML5 technologies all the while using HTML5 to drive very compelling presentations.  Where possible, I can demonstrate new technology right in the presentation itself. The one thing I hadn’t been able to figure out was how to remotely drive my Reveal.js presentations while I’m standing 10 feet away from my computer.

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Test the Web Forward

The Web is constantly evolving, new W3C specs are being hashed out all the time.  Partial and full implementations of these new specs are showing up in different browsers all the time.  But, if we as a Web community want the Web to evolve, and want people to really trust their businesses and technology on the Web as a platform, there needs to be tests in place to ensure that new specs are implemented consistently, correctly, and meet our expectations.

Test the Web Forward arose from that need.  Representatives from the W3C, Google, Mozilla, Microsoft, Opera and Adobe put together hackathons around the world to teach people about new Web features and to get people to help write tests against these features.

I highly encourage you all to at least get on the mailing list and follow @testthewebfwd and #testtwf.

If you’re going to be in the Seattle area on April 12-13, 2013, you should definitely check out the Test the Web Forward – Seattle event, being hosted by Microsoft.

 

Offline Viewing of YouTube Videos

Lately we’ve been starting to create an Adobe TechLive YouTube channel so people can view the recordings for the various TechLive sessions. You can find that channel here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/AdobeTechLive.

Sometimes though, you want to watch a YouTube video offline, perhaps while you’re sitting on a train with spotty Wifi coverage.  There’s a service I came across that lets you download files from all kinds of services, including YouTube:

http://savefrom.net (http://sfrom.net also works)

What’s nice is if you simply append the link to the YouTube video after http://sfrom.net, it will take you to a page that will let you download that specific video.  For example, Christophe Coenraets recently did a TechLive session on architecting a real-world PhoneGap application. You can find the recording here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJINt-g9vBg.

 If you want to download that recording for offline viewing though, you simply need to go here:

http://sfrom.net/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJINt-g9vBg

Pretty slick.